Many legal minds making NZ LAW work

We are an association of independent legal practices, proactively sharing ideas and expertise for the benefit of our clients.

Publications

Latest Newsletters

Fine Print

Published three times a year. Fineprint is NZ LAW's flagship publication with wide-ranging articles.

Read the latest issue

Commercial eSpeaking

Covering in-depth business law issues, this newsletter is distributed three times a year to member firms' commercial clients.

Read the latest issue

Trust eSpeaking

Published two times a year. Covers stories of interest to trustees and professionals advising on asset protection and trusts.

Read the latest issue

Property Speaking

Published three times a year. Keeping property investors and owners abreast of current property issues.

Read the latest issue

Rural eSpeaking

Covers stories of interest to farmers and those working in the rural sector, in matters relating to New Zealand's heartland.

Read the latest issue

Find a Law Firm

If you would to talk with a lawyer on any of the topics covered in any five of our client newsletters.

Find a law firm

Articles

Published 22nd November 2019 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Comes into force early 2021
The Trusts Act 2019 will come into effect on 30 January 2021. Much of the Act updates or restates existing law. However, there are a number of changes about which trustees and people with trusts should be aware.

Published 1st October 2019 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

The new Trusts Act 2019 will come into effect on 30 January 2021. Much of the Act updates or restates law that exists already, either in statute or in case law. There are, however, a number of changes about which trustees and settlors should be aware.

The Act contains ‘mandatory’ and ‘default’ duties for trustees.

Published 1st October 2019 by Greg Kelly, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Grandparents often want to give some financial assistance to their grandchildren and great-grandchildren. There can be a number of good reasons for making specific provision for grandchildren in your will or through a family trust. The traditional will-drafting practice is for parents to provide for each other and then when both of them have died, they provide for their children, on the assumption that their children will then in turn acquire assets and provide for grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Published 1st October 2019 by Colette Mackenzie, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Increasing numbers of elderly New Zealanders are going into residential care and seeking the government’s residential care subsidy. The legislation governing the subsidy is the Residential Care and Disability Support Services Act 2018, and the assessment procedure is overseen by the Ministry of Social Development (MSD).

Published 23rd July 2019 by Laurel Simm, Law North Limited

Making a good choice
Having an executor of your will is like having a manager of your affairs (your estate) after your death. Your executor is named in your will; it is his or her role to carry out the terms of your will. Many people have more than one executor; it spreads the load and it’s also good to have another executor to discuss things with.

Published 25th February 2019 by Chris Kelly, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

It’s a time-consuming and expensive process if you don’t have an EPA
Most people are now aware of the importance of having an enduring power of attorney (EPA). If you are unable to make decisions for yourself at any stage (either temporarily or longer term) it is important there is someone in place to act on your behalf. What happens to you, and your family situation, if you have no EPA?

Ensuring you have EPAs (for property and for your health and welfare) is a very important part of keeping your personal affairs in order. An EPA can be used if you are out of the country for a long time and you need someone to keep an eye on your financial affairs, or if you become mentally incapacitated and cannot look after your property or yourself.

Published 25th February 2019 by Colette Mackenzie, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Helping your children – with care
Contributions by family members to the purchase of a property and how this is recorded can affect property ownership. We discuss how you can help your children and, at the same time, lessen the risks to you as parents.

New Zealand houses have never been more unaffordable: in the 1950s to 1980s a house cost two to three times the average household income. In the 1990s it was four times the average, and by the 2000s it was up to six times the average household income. When you add in the fact that households are now far more likely to have two incomes (compared with the single income norm of the 1950s), housing looks even less affordable.

Published 25th February 2019 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

What the future may hold for separating couples with a trust

When a marriage, civil union or de facto relationship breaks down, the couple will usually divide their property according to the Property (Relationships) Act 1976 (the PRA). However, these two people often hold property in a trust rather than personally. 

The PRA has limited remedies to access property which has been put in a trust, and this can result in unfairness when a couple separates if there are no assets that they own personally. 
The Law Commission has undertaken a review of the PRA and proposed that the legislation be changed to make it easier to access trust property when a couple separates.

Published 26th February 2018 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

It can be an unpleasant surprise

Published 26th February 2018 by Chris Kelly, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

As parents age, their children often find they need to take an increasing role in looking after them.