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Fine Print

Published three times a year. Fineprint is NZ LAW's flagship publication with wide-ranging articles.

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Commercial eSpeaking

Covering in-depth business law issues, this newsletter is distributed three times a year to member firms' commercial clients.

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Trust eSpeaking

Published two times a year. Covers stories of interest to trustees and professionals advising on asset protection and trusts.

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Property Speaking

Published three times a year. Keeping property investors and owners abreast of current property issues.

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Rural eSpeaking

Covers stories of interest to farmers and those working in the rural sector, in matters relating to New Zealand's heartland.

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Articles

Published 17th August 2020 by Chris Kelly, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Best to sign again after lockdown to avoid later complications
During the COVID lockdown, special rules applied to the signing of some legal documents. Obviously it was, and is, not possible to have your signature witnessed by someone outside your bubble in Levels 3 and 4. So the law allowed signing over audio-visual link (AVL) and other similar arrangements. While these documents will remain valid in the future, it may be wise to have wills and enduring powers of attorney (EPAs) signed out of lockdown to avoid any time-consuming queries later on.

Published 17th August 2020 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Decision-making can be affected by bias
In a recent case , trustees’ decision-making came under scrutiny from the High Court.
Lara Unkovich was a young teenager when her grandfather died in 2016, leaving her a share of his estate. Her share was worth around $65,000. Under his will Lara would not receive the funds until she was 21 years old. The trustees, however, had the power to make payments towards her ‘maintenance, education, advancement or benefit.’ The trustees were her aunt Margaret and a lawyer.

Published 17th August 2020 by Colette Mackenzie, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Sign a contracting out agreement

When entering a second or subsequent relationship, it is common to want to keep assets safe from relationship property claims. An effective way to do this can be by transferring assets to a trust. Care needs to be taken, however, to ensure you do this within the law.
A recent case reminds us that transferring assets to trust will generally be ineffective where:
• You have already met someone, and the relationship is ‘in contemplation’, and
• You don’t sign a contracting out agreement.

Published 20th February 2020 by Colette Mackenzie, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Law Commission to review conflicting inheritance laws
In late 2019 the Law Commission reported back to the government on its review of the Property (Relationships) Act 1976 (PRA). Discussion on Part 8 of the PRA that deals with the division of relationship property on the death of a spouse or partner was specifically excluded from the scope of that review.

Acknowledging the issues that could arise by not addressing the division of property when a spouse/partner dies, in December last year the government asked the Law Commission to review the law of succession – that is, the law that governs who inherits a person’s property when they die.

Published 20th February 2020 by Chris Kelly, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

How many people should you name as attorneys?
In previous articles in Trust eSpeaking, we have explained why it is important to have an enduring power of attorney (EPA) and the problems that can be created if you do not have one when the need arises. You should have two EPAs – one for property, and the other for personal care and welfare.

In your EPA, you should also take care to name appropriate people as your attorneys. Ideally you should name two people to manage your property, which also includes your finances and investments.

Published 20th February 2020 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

How much can a disinherited child expect?
The Family Protection Act 1955 allows children to bring claims against the estate of a deceased parent on the basis that their parent did not adequately provide for their ‘proper maintenance and support’. Exactly what constitutes ‘proper maintenance and support’ is the subject of considerable litigation, as well as extensive commentary in the media.

Since a trio of Court of Appeal decisions in the early 2000s, a general understanding has emerged that awards under the family protection legislation can be quantified by referring to a percentage of the relevant estate. It has long been said that a financially-stable adult child might expect to receive between 10%–20% of the estate of their deceased parent, depending on a number of factors including the size of the estate and the position of others under the will or those people who are entitled to make a claim. In many cases, the 10%–20% threshold has become an informal benchmark when assessing the position of a financially-stable adult child making a claim against a modest, but not insignificant, estate.

Published 22nd November 2019 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Comes into force early 2021
The Trusts Act 2019 will come into effect on 30 January 2021. Much of the Act updates or restates existing law. However, there are a number of changes about which trustees and people with trusts should be aware.

Published 1st October 2019 by Kimberly Lawrence, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

The new Trusts Act 2019 will come into effect on 30 January 2021. Much of the Act updates or restates law that exists already, either in statute or in case law. There are, however, a number of changes about which trustees and settlors should be aware.

The Act contains ‘mandatory’ and ‘default’ duties for trustees.

Published 1st October 2019 by Greg Kelly, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Grandparents often want to give some financial assistance to their grandchildren and great-grandchildren. There can be a number of good reasons for making specific provision for grandchildren in your will or through a family trust. The traditional will-drafting practice is for parents to provide for each other and then when both of them have died, they provide for their children, on the assumption that their children will then in turn acquire assets and provide for grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Published 1st October 2019 by Colette Mackenzie, Greg Kelly Law Ltd

Increasing numbers of elderly New Zealanders are going into residential care and seeking the government’s residential care subsidy. The legislation governing the subsidy is the Residential Care and Disability Support Services Act 2018, and the assessment procedure is overseen by the Ministry of Social Development (MSD).